IHV > Global Programs : IHV in Kenya
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IHV in Kenya

Kenya

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The IHV has two programs funded by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and one funded by the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief or PEPFAR, operating in Kenya.

In line with the Institute’s goals of expanding research and medical education activities in countries where it provides care and treatment to patients living with HIV, the IHV was granted a medical education training grant to support the Partnership for Advanced Clinical Education (PACE). This federally funded U.S. CDC program aims to train medical officers, clinical officers and nurses in advanced HIV medicine. The second grant is the U.S. CDC funded Partnership for Advanced Care and Treatment (PACT), which is based in sites within the Nairobi region and aims to provide care and treatment for persons living with HIV. The third grant, funded by U.S. PEPFAR, is the AIDSRelief program in Kenya of which the IHV is the technical lead.

The Kenya program has piloted many processes that have resulted in high patient retention rates (especially in pediatric populations), low mortality and improvement in patient management systems. Many of these pilots (especially those from the Continuous Quality Improvement program) have been duplicated in other countries.

In addition to training that mainly targets “mid-level” providers, such as nurses and clinical officers who handle the bulk of HIV patient management, the IHV has been instrumental in the development and advancement of the Kenyan national guidelines in HIV prevention, treatment and care.

The recent partnership between the IHV and the University of Nairobi in both education and treatment programs is expected to provide a platform for the IHV to continue playing a major roll in Kenya for a number of years to come.

AIDSRelief is the Institute’s longest running program in Kenya. For more than six years – through its 29 partner treatment facilities – the Kenya AIDSRelief program has enrolled almost 100,000 patients in care and treatment including the highest number of children among the AIDSRelief countries.