Skip to main content

UM School of Medicine’s Institute of Human Virology Awarded Grants to Strengthen COVID-19 Response in Sub-Saharan Africa

June 02, 2020 | John Nagiecki

Man CharuratThe Center for International Health, Education and Biosecurity (Ciheb) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Institute of Human Virology was awarded $4 million from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to support coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) response activities in Botswana, Nigeria, Malawi, and Mozambique.

"Low-resource regions in Africa are vulnerable to the impact of COVID-19, and Ciheb is engaged and well-positioned to build upon our partnerships with ministries of health in each country to further the understanding of the pandemic, while strengthening their capacity to monitor and control the spread of the disease,” said Man E. Charurat, PhD, MHS, professor of medicine, Ciheb global director and director, Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine.

Kristen StaffordIn Nigeria, the award of $2.1 million will support a population-based epidemiological study to estimate COVID-19 prevalence in communities, household transmission, the proportion of subclinical infections, and risk factors for infection, using methods similar to the WHO Unity Studies to ensure comparability across countries.

The study will be led by principal investigator, Kristen Stafford, PhD, MPH, assistant professor of epidemiology and public health and Ciheb Associate Director, Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine. Data generated from this study will characterize the spectrum of disease resulting from COVID-19 and provide critical information on the clinical course and outcomes of COVID-19. 

This information will be vital to inform local response efforts, including the development of strategies to target potential prevention and control interventions to high risk groups, develop clinical treatment guidelines to mitigate the effects of COVID-19, and strengthen the health system to respond to the pandemic.  In addition, technical assistance will be provided to enhance and strengthen disease surveillance and improve laboratory diagnostics.

 Ndwapi, NdwapiIn Botswana, under the leadership of country director Ndwapi, Ndwapi, MD, the award of $810,000 will support the development of an influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) surveillance systems for the Botswana Ministry of Health and Wellness to capture community circulation and transmission of SARS-CoV-2. This will include establishing sentinel surveillance sites to more rapidly detect SARS-CoV-2.

Other measures that will be supported include the development of a web-based surveillance data entry platform to enable real-time situational awareness, the implementation of a standardized approach to data collection and reporting for comparability across sites in Botswana and facilitating timely sharing of surveillance data between human and animal sectors to inform evidence-based planning. The funding will also support measures to facilitate social distancing and decongestion at healthcare facilities by constructing temporary consultation areas and the procurement of personal protective equipment for healthcare workers.

In Malawi, the award of $795,000 will enhance the Malawi Ministry of Health’s laboratory capacity in five primary areas: training, quality control, supplies, services, and waste management. This initiative is led by Alash’le Abimiku, PhD, professor of medicine, Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine and the executive director of the International Research Center of Excellence at the Institute of Human Virology–Nigeria.

Interventions will include bench-level technical assistance and training at 10 molecular labs located across the nation to ensure technicians are skilled in implementing diagnostics for COVID-19, using both the Daan Gene Assay and the CDC COVID-19 protocol. Laboratory quality assurance will also be improved with a focus on specimen collection management and tracking, data collection and management, proficiency testing, and external quality assurance.

Alash'le AbimikuIn Mozambique, the award of $380,000 will ensure maintenance for ABI 7500 and ABI 7900 PCR instruments installed at the National Institute of Health in Maputo Province. These instruments are used for COVID-19 diagnosis and regular maintenance is necessary to ensure accurate diagnoses.

The award, also led by Alash’le Abimiku, PhD, will also provide GeneXpert operations training, support the installation of the COVID-19 software and instrument hardware, and ensure DISA-Lab operational connectivity on GeneXpert instruments at 11 locations across the nation. The award will also fund the procurement of SARS- CoV-2 diagnostic test-kits.

Additionally, Ciheb is leading cross-cutting COVID-19 response efforts in each of the eight countries in which it works. Ciheb teams are developing clinical guidelines, improving patient triage, developing and implementing clinic safety protocols, and procuring needed personal protective equipment.

“The global threat of this pandemic requires that we work cooperatively with other nations on developing and implementing targeted response actions,” said Dean E. Albert Reece, MD, PhD, MBA, who is also Executive Vice President for Medical Affairs, UM Baltimore, and the John Z. and Akiko K. Bowers Distinguished Professor, University of Maryland School of Medicine.  “The School of Medicine, through Ciheb and the Institute of Human Virology, is proud to contribute its expertise to the ongoing work on the African continent supported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

About Ciheb

Ciheb is a leading international education, development and research center within the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Ciheb was founded in 2016 by the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. Ciheb’s mission is to conduct research, provide training, and implement evidence-based interventions at the patient, community, and population levels for sustainable positive impact. Ciheb’s global teams work to expand health service capacity and quality of service in developing nations confronting epidemic diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, and also develop strategies for early detection and rapid response to biological threats as part of the U.S. Global Health Security Agenda. For more information, see Ciheb.org.

About the Institute of Human Virology

Formed in 1996 as a partnership between the State of Maryland, the City of Baltimore, the University System of Maryland and the University of Maryland Medical System, IHV is an institute of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and is home to some of the most globally-recognized and world-renowned experts in all of virology. The IHV combines the disciplines of basic research, epidemiology and clinical research in a concerted effort to speed the discovery of diagnostics and therapeutics for a wide variety of chronic and deadly viral and immune disorders - most notably, HIV the virus that causes AIDS. For more information, see www.ihv.org.

Contact

John Nagiecki
JNagiecki@ihv.umaryland.edu
410.706.5468

Related stories

    Wednesday, November 11, 2020

    Dr. Robert Gallo on Bloomberg Asia on COVID Vaccine Prospects

    Dr. Robert C. Gallo, The Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine, co-founder and director of the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and co-founder and international scientific advisor of the Global Virus Network, discusses the timeline and safety of Covid-19 vaccine trials. He speaks with Shery Ahn and Haidi Stroud-Watts on "Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia".


    Sunday, November 01, 2020

    The Scientist: How Some Vaccines Protect Against More than Their Targets

    As researchers test existing vaccines for nonspecific protection against COVID-19, immunologists are working to understand how some inoculations protect against pathogens they weren’t designed to fend off.


    Friday, October 30, 2020

    Fox45 News: Contagion figures surrounding Covid-19

    Since the beginning of Covid-19, major questions have been asked and some still linger; how long are you contagious and can you be re-infected once you've had the virus Infectious disease physician at the University of Maryland School of Medicine Institute of Human Virology, Dr. Rohit Talwani, joined Fox 45 Morning News Friday to answer those burning questions.


    Monday, October 12, 2020

    WJLA (Washington, DC): How long can you spread coronavirus once infected? We found out.

    Social distancing, hand hygiene and face masks can help curb the spread of the highly contagious coronavirus but if you do get sick, how long can you spread COVID to others? 7 On Your Side went looking for answers.


    Thursday, October 08, 2020

    NPR: Could The Live Flu Vaccine Help You Fight Off COVID-19?

    In case you were still procrastinating getting a flu shot this year, here's another reason to make it a priority. There's a chance the vaccine could offer some protection against COVID-19 itself, says virologist Robert Gallo, who directs the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and is chairman of the Global Virus Network.


    Wednesday, September 30, 2020

    GVN’s Top Virus Experts Meet Together To Identify Most Promising Advances To Battle COVID-19 & Strategies To Prepare For Future Pandemics

    Rapid Diagnostic Testing, Repurposing Drug Therapies and Vaccines Targeting Innate Immunity, Are Integral Factors in Mitigating COVID-19. The Global Virus Network (GVN), a coalition of the world’s leading medical and basic virology research centers working to prevent illness and death from viral disease, convened a press conference with attendees from across the globe to discuss key takeaways from the GVN virtual 2020 Special Annual Meeting held September 23-24, 2020.


    Tuesday, September 29, 2020

    NPR: Scientists Experiment With TB Vaccine To See If It Slows Spread Of COVID-19

    As scientists race to develop a vaccine specific for COVID-19, some researchers are testing an old vaccine, that's been proven safe and is cheap to manufacture, to see if it could slow the pandemic.


    Monday, September 28, 2020

    Associated Press: 500 years ago, another epidemic swept Mexico: smallpox

    There were mass cremations of bodies; entire families died and the inhabitants of the city, afraid to pull their bodies out, simply collapsed their homes on top of them to bury them on the spot. The scene, beyond even the current coronavirus pandemic, was a scourge brought 500 years ago by Spanish conquistadores and their servants that exploded in Mexico City in September 1520. Smallpox and other newly introduced diseases went on to kill tens of millions of Indigenous people in the Americas who had no resistance to the European illnesses. The viruses later spread to South America, and helped lead to the downfall and overthrow of empires like the Aztecs and Incas. And its lessons remain largely forgotten today.


    Friday, August 28, 2020

    WYPR: Could Polio Vaccine Corral Covid-19?

    A safe, effective vaccine against Covid-19 could resurrect jobs, send kids back to classrooms--change our lives. But how safe and effective? And how quickly can we have it? Dr. Robert Gallo, the AIDS-research pioneer now leading virus science at the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Global Virus Network, argues we could get much of the benefit by inoculating people with an old, very cheap drug -- the oral Polio vaccine developed seven decades ago. Gallo contends it would trigger our ‘innate immunity’-- the body’s emergency response when a threat shows up.


    Friday, August 21, 2020

    Institute of Human Virology and Italian Researchers identify a SARS-CoV-2 Viral Strain with Deletion in a Protein, Possibly Reducing Fatalities

    The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, a Global Virus Network (GVN) Center of Excellence, in collaboration with scientists from Campus Biomedico in Rome, Italy announced today the results of studies showing the emergence of a SARS-CoV-2 viral strain with a deletion in a protein known as nsp1. These data, accepted for publication today by the Journal of Translational Medicine, (link here) may indicate the emergence of a less pathogenic viral strain.


    Monday, August 03, 2020

    Eureka, Charles River Laboratories: Could the Oral Polio Vaccine be Used to Prevent COVID-19?

    Virologist Robert Gallo, MD, has had a long and storied career in academic and government research. He is the Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine, co-founder and director of the Institute Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and co-founder and international scientific adviser of the Global Virus Network. Despite his deep roots in HIV, Dr. Gallo’s current focus is, not surprisingly, COVID-19, which emerged in China last year and within four months morphed into a full-blown pandemic. As usual, Dr. Gallo’s research strategy has raised eyebrows. Unlike the antibody and RNA vaccines that are all the rage in COVID-19 science, Gallo is putting his energies behind repurposing the oral polio virus vaccine developed in the 1950s by Albert Sabin.


    Monday, August 03, 2020

    Infectious Disease Special Edition: COVID-19 and HIV: Was It a Deadly Mix?

    Social distancing is one of the curses of COVID-19, and may fall more heavily on people with HIV than on those without this burden. “People with HIV, and in particular certain subsets of that group—the LGBTQ community, older adults aging with HIV, etc.—face more mental health issues than the general population,” said Sarah Schmalzle, MD, an assistant professor of medicine at the Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, in Baltimore. “Many of our patients also already face significant isolation and loneliness due to a combination of HIV stigma, losses of friends and family to HIV, and aging.”


    Friday, July 31, 2020

    RollingStone-Useful Idiots: Dr. Robert Gallo on a COVID-19 Vaccine

    Dr. Robert Gallo, director of the Institute for Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, joins the show to give his take on the prospects for an effective COVID-19 vaccine. Gallo is skeptical of the approach many organizations are taking with antibody vaccines, citing the similarly low efficacy those treatments had with HIV due to the low durability of the antibodies. Dr. Gallo’s research is mainly related to Oral Polio Vaccine, which he thinks needs to be tested more in regard to innate immunity.


    Monday, July 20, 2020

    NPR: Early Oxford-AstraZeneca Coronavirus Vaccine Data 'Encouraging,' Scientists Say

    Dr. Robert Gallo is quoted about an experimental vaccine candidate being developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University to protect against COVID-19 that triggered an immune response against the coronavirus and appeared to be safe.


    Tuesday, July 07, 2020

    Courthouse News Service: Global Progress on Ending HIV/AIDS Derailed by Covid-19

    A United Nations program aimed at eliminating HIV/AIDS released a report Monday showing that the global response to the epidemic has fallen far short of goals set for 2020, in large part due to the coronavirus pandemic.


    Monday, July 06, 2020

    Sputnik Radio: What If There Is No Vaccine for COVID-19?

    On today's episode of Loud & Clear, Brian Becker and John Kiriakou are joined by Robert Gallo, MD, the Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine, co-founder and director of the Institute Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and co-founder and international scientific adviser of the Global Virus Network. What would you think if someone told you that we already have a vaccine that at least helps fight Covid-19? That may already be the case. Two American scientists, Dr. Robert Gallo and Dr. Konstantin Chumakov, are positing that decades-old live vaccines for things like polio and tuberculosis strengthen the immune system’s first line of defense a more general way to fight infection. And the history books show us that that sometimes translates into at least some cross-protection against completely different viruses.


    Friday, July 03, 2020

    KUSI San Diego News: Dr. Robert Gallo suggests an oral polio vaccine could help fight coronavirus

    Dr. Robert Gallo from the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and Global Virus Network wrote an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal earlier this week. The opinion piece stated that OPV, oral polio vaccine, could be a cheap and effective way to fight coronavirus. Dr. Gallo discussed his opinion piece on Good Morning San Diego.


    Thursday, July 02, 2020

    13D Global Strategy & Research Report

    COVID-19 outbreaks are multiplying and immunity may be short-lived. Could existing “live” vaccines, which stimulate innate immunity, outshine vaccines targeting the “spike” protein?


    Tuesday, June 30, 2020

    Wall Street Journal Op-Ed: An Old Vaccine May Help Against Coronavirus: A tablet for polio boosts innate immunity, which fights other viruses.

    In this op-ed coauthored by Dr. Robert C. Gallo and Daniel J. Arbess, they discuss how “An Old Vaccine May Help Against Coronavirus: A tablet for polio boosts innate immunity, which fights other viruses.”


    Monday, June 29, 2020

    Baltimore Magazine Special Edition: Dr. Gallo Featured

    Dr. Robert Gallo is featured in Baltimore Magazine's special edition, "On the Front Lines: Acts of Courage and Kindness in the Age of Coronavirus."


    Friday, June 26, 2020

    IHV in the News

    Links to news stories featuring the IHV from June 11 to June 25, 2020.


    Thursday, June 25, 2020

    The New York Times: Dr. Robert Gallo: The Case for a Stopgap Vaccine

    In a letter to the editor to The New York Times entitled, "Dr. Robert Gallo: The Case for a Stopgap Vaccine," the noted virologist and head of the IHV says a polio vaccine may be an ideal solution until we find a Covid-specific vaccine.


    Wednesday, June 24, 2020

    The New York Times: Decades-Old Soviet Studies Hint at Coronavirus Strategy

    The New York Times: Decades-Old Soviet Studies Hint at Coronavirus Strategy: A married pair of virologists in Moscow tested a vaccine on their own children in the 1950s. Now, a side effect they found is sparking new hope for a defense against the coronavirus.


    Tuesday, June 23, 2020

    France 24: Dr. Mohammad Sajadi Speaks with France 24 on COVID-19 and Seasonality

    Does Covid-19 spread faster in winter? Modelling by US researchers suggests the transmission of Covid-19 could be seasonal. Mohammad Sajadi, associate professor at University of Maryland School of Medicine's Institute of Human Virology, says the virus first spread in areas of low temperature and low humidity, common to winter time in temperate areas.


    Friday, June 12, 2020

    Institute of Human Virology and Italian Researchers Find Higher Daily Temperatures Lead to a Decrease in COVID-19 Related Deaths

    Insights into population density and daily temperatures provide a path to public health strategies. The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, a Global Virus Network (GVN) Center of Excellence, in collaboration with scientists from Campus Biomedico in Rome and Ulisse Biomed and University of Trieste, in Trieste, Italy announced today the results of studies showing an inverse correlation between average high daily temperatures and COVID-19 related death rates in different geographical areas.


    Friday, June 12, 2020

    The Washington Post: We shouldn’t care who wins the vaccine ‘race’

    Dr. Robert Gallo writes a Letter to the Editor to The Washington Post entitled, “We shouldn’t care who wins the vaccine ‘race’,” regarding their June 4 front-page article “Cold War echoes in race for vaccine,” about the “race” among nations, notably the United States, China, and Russia and other European nations for development of a vaccine against the novel coronavirus.


    Friday, June 12, 2020

    CNN Health: An Existing Polio Vaccine Could Help Protect Against Coronavirus, Top Experts Say

    CNN: There is plenty of evidence that existing inoculations such as polio vaccines protect children against a wide range of infections and it's worth trying them out against the new coronavirus, a team of experts wrote in Science magazine Thursday.


    Thursday, June 11, 2020

    NBC News: Polio Vaccine Could Give Temporary Protection Against COVID-19, Scientists Hope

    NBC News: As the world waits for a coronavirus vaccine, some scientists are proposing that existing vaccines could give the body’s immune system a much-needed temporary boost to stave off infection. It’s still unclear whether such an approach would work, and some experts are skeptical. Others — including researchers in Israel, the Netherlands and Australia — are already investigating whether a tuberculosis vaccine could help jump-start the immune system and make COVID-19 less deadly, though the World Health Organization strongly advises against using that vaccine until it’s proven effective against the coronavirus.


    Monday, May 11, 2020

    BBC Global News Interviews Dr. Robert Gallo on Oral Polio Vaccine for SARS-CoV-2 and More

    Dr. Robert Gallo appeared on BBC World News with Matthew Amroliwala for a one-on-one, lengthy interview during their Coronavirus Explained segment.


    Saturday, May 09, 2020

    Dr. Robert Gallo Discuss COVID-19 Research on Aljazeera News

    Aljazeera discusses the status of therapy, testing and vaccine research on SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 with Dr. Robert Gallo.


    Thursday, May 07, 2020

    The Disappointing Truth About Antibody Testing: There’s still a lot we don’t know about COVID-19

    Dr. Robert Gallo discusses the status of COVID-19 antibody test with Vox's The Verge


    Wednesday, May 06, 2020

    The Coronavirus Appears to have Mutated. What Does that Mean for Contagiousness?

    While small mutations in the virus's genetic code are evident, it's unclear what these changes mean for people, if anything at all.


    Saturday, May 02, 2020

    IHV's Dr. Robert Gallo on FOX's Full Court Press with Greta Van Susteren

    Overtime: Dr. Robert Gallo talks coronavirus treatments and antibody testing.


    Saturday, May 02, 2020

    Dr. Robert Gallo on iHeart Radio to Discuss COVID-19

    Ryan Gorman hosts an iHeartRadio nationwide special featuring experts on COVID-19-related issues, including the co-founder and director of the Institute Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the senior vice president for U.S. Programs & Advocacy at Save the Children, and the managing editor of the Military Times. Topics range from a discussion about why some people infected by the coronavirus are asymptomatic, while others face severe reactions and even death, to assistance for impoverished children, and a breakdown of the impact the virus is having on the U.S. military and veterans.


    Friday, May 01, 2020

    Could an Oral Polio Vaccine Stop the Coronavirus Pandemic?

    A YouTube video by the American Chemical Society and produced by PBS.


    Friday, May 01, 2020

    NYT Op-Ed Features Gallo-Chumakov Oral Polio Vaccine for COVID-19 Idea

    What if We Already Have a Coronavirus Vaccine? Researchers are testing whether decades-old vaccines for polio and tuberculosis could protect against infection.


    Wednesday, April 29, 2020

    Dr. Robert Gallo Appears on C-SPAN’s Washington Journal

    Please check out Dr. Robert Gallo’s C-SPAN Washington Journal appearance today to discuss COVID-19 treatments, vaccines, the need for the Global Virus Network, and more.


    Monday, April 27, 2020

    Expert Breaks Down Coronavirus Research: Is it Worse than HIV? Is it Mutating?

    IHV Co-Founder and Director, Robert Gallo, MD is interviewed on LBC, a radio station in the United Kingdom. Darren Adam had Professor Gallo on the line to discuss his research in the past and the work he's carrying out during the coronavirus crisis. "We have learned to live with HIV" Darren began, listing out how it has changed from a death sentence to a disease that humans can live a long life with. He wondered if this could be possibly the path we're taking with Covid-19.


    Wednesday, April 22, 2020

    Dr. Robert Gallo on India Today Discussing the Oral Polio Vaccine for COVID-19

    IndiaToday on Twitter - “Can oral polio vaccine help in fighting #Covid19? @DrRobertCGallo responds. #NewsToday with @sardesairajdeep


    Friday, April 17, 2020

    Dr. Robert Gallo Discusses Repurposing the Oral Polio Vaccine on CNN

    Dr. Robert Gallo discusses repurposing the oral polio vaccine, drug therapies and more on COVID-19 on CNN’s The Lead with Jake Tapper, April 17, 2020.


    Monday, April 13, 2020

    Can an Oral Polio Vaccine Stop COVID-19?

    Please see this just released Associated Press article, “Could old vaccines for other germs protect against COVID-19?” with Dr. Robert Gallo (Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine) and Dr. Konstantin Chumakov (U.S. Food and Drug Administration), both of the Global Virus Network (GVN).


    Wednesday, April 08, 2020

    Institute of Human Virology Co-founder on Coronavirus Recovery, Antibody Testing, Drug Testing, Bloomberg TV

    Dr. Robert Gallo, the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, Co-founder and director discusses the coronavirus. He speaks with Haidi Stroud-Watts and Shery Ahn on "Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia." (Source: Bloomberg)


    Tuesday, April 07, 2020

    A Deep Look Into The Coronavirus with Dr. Robert Gallo on WYPR (Baltimore’s local NPR station)

    (WNPR) Dr. Robert Gallo has been getting to know viruses-- their targets and their weaknesses--for decades, even before he co-discovered the virus that causes AIDS in the 1980s. At the University of Maryland’s Institute for Human Virology, which he heads, Gallo is looking at the coronavirus; he joins us to share his thoughts. Gallo is also co-founder and international scientific advisor at the Global Virus Network.


    Wednesday, April 01, 2020

    Dr. Robert Gallo Featured on MSNBC’s 11th Hour with Brian Williams

    Robert Gallo, MD, Co-Founder and Director of the Institute of Human Virology, discusses SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19, specifically, how he thinks the fight against the Coronavirus is going thus far.


    Friday, March 27, 2020

    Covid-19 Is Probably Seasonal, But That’s No Reason to Relax (The Washington Post)

    Mohammad Sajadi and Anthony Amoroso are associate professors of medicine at the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and members of the Global Virus Network. As physicians and researchers, we have spoken to doctors across the country over the past few weeks and kept hearing variations on this description of the novel coronavirus’s spread: It’s like a chemical bomb went off. One day everything seemed normal, and the next everyone became sick: patients, nurses, family members.


    Thursday, March 19, 2020

    What COVID-19 Symptoms Look Like, Day By Day

    (Source: Business Insider) According to the World Health Organization-China Joint Mission on COVID-19, as of February 20, 80% of laboratory-confirmed cases were mild to moderate, 14% were severe, and 6% were critical. Just to be clear, a mild case of COVID-19 is not like a mild cold. The symptoms will still be pretty severe. Anything less than needing oxygen puts you in this category. Severe cases do need supplemental oxygen, and critical ones are defined by respiratory or multi-organ failure.


    Thursday, February 06, 2020

    IHV Joins Global Virus Network (GVN) Discussions with International Top Experts to Combat Growing Novel Coronavirus Epidemic

    The GVN, with support from the IHV, Is Bridging Gaps in the Global Emergency Response and Serving as a “Go-To” Resource for Members Needing Assistance in Obtaining and Disseminating Cutting-Edge Scientific Research.


    Wednesday, May 01, 2019

    Large National Survey Shows Smaller HIV Epidemic in Nigeria Than Once Thought and Highlights Key Gaps

    (CDC) The Government of Nigeria, the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), CDC, and the University of Maryland School of Medicine released new data from the Nigeria HIV/AIDS Indicator and Impact Survey (NAIIS), one of the largest population-based HIV/AIDS household surveys ever conducted. The NAIIS directly measured HIV prevalence and viral load suppression. According to the NAIIS results, the HIV prevalence in Nigeria is lower than previously thought, allowing the country to focus on providing services to the areas of greatest need to control the HIV epidemic.


    Monday, December 03, 2018

    Institute of Human Virology Names Dr. Man Charurat as Director of the Center for International Health, Education, and Biosecurity

    The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine today announced the appointment of Man E. Charurat, PhD, MHS, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Division of Epidemiology and Prevention at the IHV as the Director of IHV’s Center for International Health, Education, and Biosecurity (CIHEB). Dr. Charurat will replace Deus Bazira, DrPH, MPH, MBA. The announcement was made by Robert C. Gallo, MD, The Homer & Martha Gudelsky Distinguished Professor in Medicine, Co-Founder and Director of the IHV, and Co-Founder and Director of the Global Virus Network (GVN).


    Tuesday, November 22, 2016

    IHV Awarded $138M to combat HIV/AIDS in Africa & Launches Center for International Health, Education, & Biosecurity

    The Institute of Human Virology (IHV) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine announced today more than $138 million in multiple five-year grants awarded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to combat HIV/AIDS in Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, and Nigeria. The Institute concurrently announced the formation of the IHV Center for International Health, Education, & Biosecurity (CIHEB), and its newly appointed director, Deus Bazira Mubangizi, DrPH, MBA, MPH, Assistant Professor of Medicine, Director, Center for Health, Education, & Biosecurity, Institute of Human Virology, University of Maryland School of Medicine.