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Program

Overview

Program Overview

In its twenty-first year, IHV2019 will convene to address strategies to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and the intersection of HIV and opioid use disorder (OUD). The conference will open by highlighting the recent plan for "Ending the HIV Epidemic" by 2030, with expert opinions from Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID),  Nora Volkow, MD, Director, National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA) and Dr. Carl Diffenbach, Director of Division of AIDS, NIAID.

A critical component of ending the HIV epidemic is successful implementation of prevention strategies. Sexual education, condoms, syringe exchange, and pre-exposure prophylaxis will be reviewed, along with challenges and possibilities in wide-spread implementation. In addition, various agencies will describe the utilization of broad epidemiologic approaches to solidify our understanding of HIV in America.

With the rising opioid epidemic in the United States, resulting in localized HIV outbreaks, the impact of OUD on HIV is increasingly relevant. Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of the National Institute of Drug Abuse, will give a special lecture on the subject. Speakers will discuss strategies specific to addressing HIV in patients who inject drugs (PWID), incorporating treatment of OUD into infectious disease practice, and the value of harm reduction strategies, such as supervised injection facilities, in improving outcomes in PWID.

Thursday, October 3

Day 1: Thursday, October 3, 2019

Topic: Zero Transmission

(Schedule to be announced)

Responses to the HIV/AIDS Epidemic

In February 2019, multiple agencies within the federal government together announced a new initiative to address the HIV epidemic, setting the goal of a 90 percent reduction in incident HIV by 2029.  The “Ending the HIV Epidemic” pathway is based in four pillars: (1) Diagnose, with an emphasis on early detection; (2) Treat, initiating ART rapidly; (3) Protect, utilizing prevention strategies such as PrEP; and (4) Respond, detecting new HIV clusters. The initial phase of the initiative will target 48 counties that serve as hotspots of new infection across the US. In this session, Dr. Carl Dieffenbach, Director of Division of AIDS, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID); Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of NIAID; and Dr. Robert Redfield, Director of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Institute of Human Virology (IHV) Founding Member, will detail this ambitious response.

HIV/AIDS Prevention Strategies

Despite progress in reducing incident HIV in the United States, there remains a disproportionate rise amongst marginalized populations including black and Latino MSM, persons who inject drugs (PWID), black female heterosexuals, and transgender individuals, and a concentration of these new cases in the South. As such, there is a renewed interest in evidence-based prevention strategies to target these populations, many of whom remain out of medical care. In this session, prevention strategies including sexual education, condoms, syringe exchange, and pre-exposure prophylaxis will be reviewed, along with challenges and possibilities in wide-spread implementation.

HIV/AIDS Epidemiology

HIV Epidemiology is utilized to not only understand the current state of infection, but to target intervention and prevention efforts. Through molecular sequencing, the field has undergone a transition, enabling transmission mapping and analysis of risk on a scale broader than ever before. At the same time, the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS remains highly connected to individual behavioral patterns, underscoring the role of public health departments in testing and education. In this session, various agencies will describe the utilization of broad epidemiologic approaches to solidify our understanding of HIV in America.

Friday, October 4

Day 2: Friday, October 4, 2019

Topic: Opioid Intersection

(Schedule to be announced)

Epidemiology of HIV-Opioid Intersection

There is a rising opioid epidemic in the United States, marked by staggering rates of opioid overdose death. While rates of HIV acquisition attributable to drug use have declined over the past decade, this rise of opioid misuse, and in particular, injecting drug use, has resulted in localized HIV outbreaks. This session will focus on the epidemiology of the overlapping epidemics of HIV and opioid use disorder (OUD). Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of the National Institute of Drug Abuse, will open this session with a special lecture on the subject.

Closing the Gap

The ongoing transmission of viral infections in people who inject drugs is, in large part, a result of gaps in access to treatment and evidence based harm reduction strategies. In order to meaningfully interrupt HIV transmission in PWID, strides need to be made to close gaps in care for this marginalized population, including addressing OUD as part of infectious disease care. Speakers will discuss strategies specific to addressing HIV in PWID, incorporating treatment of OUD into infectious disease practice, and the value of harm reduction strategies, such as supervised injection facilities, in improving outcomes in PWID.